Choosing the Right Interfacing for Your Project

When I first started to learn to sew with interfacing, I just looked for “fusible” and grabbed the first one I saw, thinking they were all basically the same aside form fusible/non-fusible differences. However, there are several (and I mean several) different types of interfacing for different projects and fabrics.

Now that you’ve learned how to attach fusible and non-fusible interfacing, how exactly do you choose the interfacing you need?

Choosing Interfacing Based on Fusibility:

So you know the basic differences between fusible interfacing and non-fusible interfacing, but you want to know when to use one over the other. As a general rule, fusible is better for beginners. Non-fusible (sew-in) interfacing can add bulk to a project that may be difficult for a beginner to handle. Attaching fusible interfacing is also a great way to practice your pressing! It uses less thread and is ( at least I think) a little less time-consuming.

However, sew-in interfacing looks more natural than fusible. Also, if your fabric cannot be pressed you obviously cannot attach a fusible interfacing to it. Here is a handy guide to fabrics that you generally should not hit with an iron or fusible interfacing.

Choosing Interfacing Based on Composition:

There are three basic classifications of interfacing based on composition: woven, non-woven, and knit. The differences are pretty easy to remember!

Knit interfacing is generally used for very stretchy knit fabrics, like jersey, because the interfacing can stretch with the fabric. Using a woven interfacing on a very stretchy fabric will inhibit its movement.

Woven interfacing should be used on very fine fabrics like silk. Woven interfacing has a grainline just like a woven fabric, so you have to cut the interfacing to match the grainline of your fabric, which helps the garment or craft stay true to its shape but can be a little challenging and takes up more of your material. Don’t use woven unless you absolutely need it!

Non-woven interfacing is a nice all-purpose interfacing for most projects, unless you’re using a very fine or very stretchy fabric. It does not have a grainline, so you can cut it in any direction, which makes it a more economical choice. As a beginner, this is what you should choose pretty much every time you have to buy interfacing.

Choosing Interfacing Based on Weight:

Finally, you have to consider the weight of your fabric and how it will be used when choosing interfacing. Aside from some specialty types of interfacing, interfacing is basically classified into a few groups based on weight:

  • Featherweight interfacing – Also called “sheer.” Use featherweight interfacing for very, very light fabrics.
  • Lightweight interfacing – The go-to for most garments.
  • Medium-weight interfacing – I would recommend medium-weight interfacing for crafts that you need to hold some shape but don’t want to be too stiff, like tote bags.
  • Heavyweight interfacing – This is best for most home decor, and when you need a project to hold a rigid shape.

In general, you should simply match the weight of your interfacing to the weight of your fabric. I’ve also heard that when in doubt between two types of interfacing, go with the lighter weight to play it safe. An interfacing that’s too heavy for your fabric will give it a strange appearance when finished.

If all of this seems a little overwhelming, don’t worry! You’ll get the hang of it soon. Plus, several fabric stores actually have an interfacing guide next to their rack of interfacing bolts to help you choose the right one for your project.

Happy sewing!
Learni.st – Learn how to sew starting from step one
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Sewing with Elastic: Elastic Casing

Hello sewists! Sorry for the hold up in posts – lent my camera to a friend for the weekend and just got it back. But now it’s time to get back to business by learning to use a new notion in your projects: sewing with elastic.

Sewing with elastic is a great skill to learn, and learning how to sew with elastic can be the first step in moving from beginner projects to more personalized crafts and garments. As mentioned in this earlier post, there are two ways to add elastic to your project. You can either insert it into a casing or sew it directly to your fabric.

In this post, we’ll cover the easier of the two: sewing an elastic casing.

I’m going to demonstrate by making a small bag with an elastic opening.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

The first thing I did was to measure out a rectangular shape – about 14″ x 6 1/2″. That way my bag would be roughly 6″ x 6″ when completed. I only cut one piece of fabric to fold in half to use as the bag, but you can also cut two identical pieces to stitch together. The folded version is just easier!

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Here is my cut out piece of fabric that will become a small bag! Next it’s time to fold it in half as I mentioned before.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your StuffA bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

If you’re using a fabric with a right side and a wrong side, fold right sides together. The fabric I’m using does not have a district wrong side, so it’s a little hard to tell in these pictures. But when you do this fold, the wrong side should be on the outside.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Press the fold in place so that all raw edges are even, including the sides and the opening. The fold will be the bottom of the bag. Next we will stitch the side seams.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

The side seams are the raw edges perpendicular to the fold. Stitch, press, and trim the sides.

Now it’s time to look at your elastic. What is the width? Mine for this project is 1/2 inch. The width of your casing should be about 1/4 inch wider than your elastic band, so I’m going to do a casing that is 3/4 inches.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your StuffA bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

At the opening of your bag with wrong side out, measure the width of your elastic casing and press it down all around the bag.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Here is the pressed elastic casing. Remember, at this point your bag should be wrong side out.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Place two marks along the edge of your casing, approximately 2 inches apart. This will be the opening where you insert your elastic.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your StuffA bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Next, stitch your casing shut starting at one mark all the way around to the second mark, but leaving the 2 inch opening unstitched.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Attach a safety pin to one end of your elastic. Don’t attach it right to the end because it might get pulled off!

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your StuffA bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Push the elastic through the casing safety pin first, moving the fabric over the safety pin. Make sure your elastic does not get twisted in this process! When your safety pin has made it all the way around the bag, overlap the ends of your elastic. I’m making my elastic band a little shorter than the circumference of the bag so that the casing will have some bunch to it when finished.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your StuffA bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Stitch the ends of your elastic together multiple times, backstitching several times. Trim the excess ends and push the elastic band fully into the casing.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

Sew the 2 inch opening shut, with your elastic band fully enclosed in the casing.

A bag with an elastic casing is an easy craft for a beginner learning how to sew elastic, a sewing notion - Sew Me Your Stuff

And voila! You now have a bag with an elastic opening! This skill will come in handy for many projects, more than just simple bags!

Happy sewing!

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Etsy – Shop Sew Me Your Stuff

How to Attach Non-Fusible Interfacing

Hello sewists! I’ve covered the usefulness of interfacing in this post, and earlier I shared a post about how to attach fusible interfacing, which you can view here.

However, not all interfacing is fusible. Some forms of interfacing are non-fusible and cannot be attached just using steam and heat.

Fusible interfacing is a really great tool for giving shape to your projects and doesn’t require being stitched onto fabric. Non-fusible interfacing is sometimes called “sew-in” interfacing because it doesn’t have an adhesive side like fusible interfacing does and has to be attached by being sewn to the fabric.

The process of attaching non-fusible interfacing differs a little bit from attaching fusible interfacing, so here’s a guide to using non-fusible interfacing to give a project some shape.

First, you’ll want to cut out your pattern pieces. I’m demonstrating on a Christmas stocking, and I’m attaching interfacing to the lining so that it holds the stocking shape.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

Notice that I cut out the interfacing to be the exact same size as the fabric piece. When cutting out fusible interfacing you also cut it to be the same size at first. However, non-fusible is different in that you don’t trim the edges before attaching.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

Pin the interfacing to the fabric, matching the raw edges.

Tip: Notice that my pins are not right along the raw edge like you normally do when pinning together two pieces of fabric. I also used as few pins as possible. This is because the interfacing is very thick and can get distorted easily with the pins. I removed the pins as I stitched to keep the edges as even as possible.

Before you stitch, you should have decided how wide your seam allowance will be. When you stitch the interfacing onto the fabric, you’ll want to use a slightly shorter seam allowance so that the interfacing will definitely be stitched into your seam.

For example, I typically use a 1/2 inch seam allowance. So for this piece of fabric, I’ll be using a 3/8 inch seam allowance when attaching my interfacing.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

Stitch the interfacing onto the fabric as a normal straight stitch.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

After you stitch the interfacing onto the fabric, trim the interfacing very close to the stitch to reduce bulk in your seams. This is why you have to use a shorter seam allowance rather than one that is the same length that you normally use. After you trim your interfacing, you can still be sure that it will be in your line of stitching and give your fabric a smooth look.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your StuffLearning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

Now your interfacing is attached directly to the fabric. Remember that non-fusible interfacing is different from fusible in that when attaching fusible, you trim the edges before you attach. As you can see with the non-fusible interfacing, you trim  after you attach.

Next I repeated this process on the matching piece of fabric and stitched the two together to form the lining of the stocking. When I stitch the seam, notice that the seam stitch is slightly deeper than the stitch used to attach the interfacing.

Learning the difference between fusible and non-fusible interfacing and how to attach each is important for a beginner learning to sew with sewing notions - Sew Me Your Stuff

The stitch closer to the raw edge is the stitch used to attach the interfacing, and the deeper stitch is the seam.

All in all, non-fusible interfacing is no more difficult to attach than fusible. I tend to prefer fusible because you don’t have to use as much thread and it sticks directly to the fabric. When stitching my non-fusible interfacing, I had trouble with the fabric and interfacing becoming separated and throwing off my stitches which isn’t a problem I have with fusible.

Remember to use the interfacing guide at your fabric store if possible to pick the right interfacing for your project!

Learni.st – Learn how to sew starting from step one
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September/October 2012 Summary

Hello sewists! It’s November, which means it’s time to put the shorts away and stay warm inside while you get started on some Christmas crafts! If you’ve fallen behind on Sew Me Your Stuff posts, here’s a recap of what’s been covered the last couple of months.

Need to go back further? Past recaps:

Sewing Patterns:

Sewing Machine Help:

Notions and other Tools:

A Bag’s Life:

Remember, if you ever would like to see a topic covered by Sew Me Your Stuff, just submit it here!

Learni.st – Learn how to sew starting from step one
Pinterest & Twitter – Follow for tips, ideas, and more
Etsy – Shop Sew Me Your Stuff